Congratulations — David Holstius graduates

Congratulations to David Holstius, who graduated over the weekend with a PhD in Environmental Health Sciences.  David’s dissertation, entitled “Monitoring Particulate Matter with Commodity Hardware”, describes work he’s done to develop and utilize lower-cost PM instruments for improved exposure assessment and environmental epidemiological studies.

Sensor Networks for Environmental Journalism

I’m participating in this event organized by Internews at Berkeley on April 30th. I’ll report soon on the technology I’m developing for this project…

Groundtruth and Airwaves: Sensor Networks and Emerging Technology for Environmental Journalism

Technology–as remote as satellites and as close as our smartphones–offers new opportunities for collecting data about environmental topics. Evidence of rising sea levels, poor air quality, noise pollution and more can now be gathered from wireless sensor networks, open public data sets, and user-generated data from social media platforms. These tools make it simpler to gather, analyze and visualize data, helping to drive news stories for journalists and more thoughtful engagement and advocacy by activists.

“Groundtruth and Airwaves” will showcase a number of newsworthy environmental and health-related sensor projects currently underway. After a session of Lightning Talks, working journalists from around the world will join a panel of technology experts and research scientists to explore opportunities and challenges found at the nexus of DIY sensors, crowdsourced data, and environmental and health journalism.

Bay Area Air Quality Management District funds our new sensor study

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District has funded a collaboration between Professor Ron Cohen’s group in Atmospheric Chemistry and my group in Environmental Health to evaluate new air quality sensors in the laboratory for future deployment at sites within the Bay Area.  The goal of the project is to inform how sensors may be used to augment routine air quality monitoring sites to better assess community exposures to air pollution.  This funding will support the work of PhD student David Holstius, who is leading the development and evaluation of new low-cost air quality sensor networks in my research group.

 

Congratulations Team Tekla! — Wins 1st Place in Big Ideas@Berkeley

Just heard the great news.  Team Tekla Labs won the 1st Place prize in the Big Ideas@Berkeley competition.  Go Team Tekla!  I knew you guys could do it!

This year, I have been fortunate to work with this exciting student-run initiative that aims to bring low-cost DIY designs for much needed basic lab equipment to the world.  With ties to Instructables, Autodesk, Make Magazine, and DIYbio, Tekla Labs is creating designs and hosting competitions to invent new designs to meet the needs of not only disease control laboratories, but also research and educational in the developing world, as well as impoverished schools in the developed world.

http://www.teklalabs.org

 

Tekla Labs: Bringing DIY Labs to the Developing World

bemagWith much of the world’s burden of disease affecting the Bottom Billion in the developing world, bringing effective resources to these regions should be a public health priority.

While the need for drugs, diagnostics, and improved sanitation is well-recognized, thus far little attention has been paid to the more fundamental needs for basic infrastructure to support disease control programs.  Basic needs, such as simple laboratory equipment to support even the most rudimentary disease biology and chemistry work, are often undervalued. How can we combat disease when basic equipment like a microscope, pipet, and centrifuge are non-existent, or sitting on a shelf broken and useless?

Enter Tekla Labs.  www.teklalabs.org

This year, I have been fortunate to work with this exciting student-run initiative that aims to bring low-cost DIY designs for much needed basic lab equipment to the world.  With ties to Instructables, Autodesk, Make Magazine, and DIYbio, Tekla Labs is creating designs and hosting competitions to invent new designs to meet the needs of not only disease control laboratories, but also research and educational in the developing world, as well as impoverished schools in the developed world.

 How can we combat disease when basic equipment like a microscope, pipet, and centrifuge are non-existent, or sitting on a shelf broken and useless?

Please support Tekla Labs by hosting or funding one of their competitions: http://www.teklalabs.org/contact/