New center to develop mobile apps to improve Native American cardiovascular health

National Vital Statistics System, CDC, and the U.S. Census Bureau

Hypertension is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affecting 1 in 3 US adults or about 78 million people. It is very common as well as understudied in American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders. A new center called Native-Controlling Hypertension and Risk Through Technology (Native-CHART) will bring together academic and community partners, who will conduct research and outreach to improve hypertension in these populations.

Native-CHART is one of two new centers funded by the NIH National Intitutes of Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) that together will share $20 million over the next 5 years. Native-CHART is co-led by Dedra Buchwald at Washington State University and Spero Manson at the University of Colorado. The center will have broad reach across Native populations, including Satellite Centers in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountain, Plains, Southwest, Northern, and Southeast regions.

New technologies will play a key role in Native-CHART, both as tools for research, as well as tools for engaging with groups in the center. For instance, mobile technologies will play a role in collecting objective data on a variety of risk factors including diet, food environments, and physical activity for hypertension.  Dr. Edmund Seto’s group will help develop mobile apps that track aspects of cardiovascular risk for the center.

Patent Application for a new passive low-cost air pollution sensor

PM air pollution is responsiblity for close to a million deaths and is associated with considerable poor health around the world.

Collaborators from UW Engineering and I filed a new patent for a “Passive Low-Cost Air Pollution Sensor”.  The invention will hopefully pave the way more accurate and precise assessments of PM levels in the developing world, using readily available and inexpensive supplies.