New Study to Develop Environmental Exposure Monitoring for Pediatric Asthma

My group at UW was awarded a $2M grant to work with the National Institutes of Health on a new program called Pediatric Research using Integrated Sensor Monitoring Systems (PRISMS).  The goal of this program is the “development of wearable and non-wearable sensors that can monitor pediatric environmental exposures, physiological signals, activity, and/or behavior in a natural environment to gain new insights into environmental determinants of asthma.”

This new grant will bring together researchers at UW in the Environmental Health Sciences, Pediatrics, and Engineering to develop a new environmental exposure monitoring system for PRISMS.  Research partners include Professors Novosselov, Posner, Korshin, Mamishev, Yost and Karr. The study will test the system for use in the HAPI asthma intervention study in Yakima, WA.

Close to 1 in 10 children in the U.S. suffer from asthma.  Children who have asthma are prone to acute exacerbations of airway inflammation (asthma “attacks”) that may be triggered by numerous environmental exposures, including infectious agents, pollens, smoke, mold, chemicals, etc.  The morbidity associated with children’s asthma is large. Asthma is the third most common cause for child hospitalization for those less than 15 years old. It is a leading cause of school absenteeism.  And, there are large public health disparities associated with asthma: those that are poor, and of certain races and ethnicities are more likely to suffer from asthma.  Through the technologies developed in the PRISMS program, improved understanding of the relationship between exposures and asthma symptoms may help researchers and asthmatic families manage the disease better.